Difference between revisions of "Wiki activity"

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A wiki is a collection of collaboratively authored web documents. Basically, a wiki page is a web page everyone in your class can create together, right in the browser, without needing to know HTML. A wiki starts with one front page. Each author can add other pages to the wiki by simply creating a link to a page that doesn't exist yet.
 
A wiki is a collection of collaboratively authored web documents. Basically, a wiki page is a web page everyone in your class can create together, right in the browser, without needing to know HTML. A wiki starts with one front page. Each author can add other pages to the wiki by simply creating a link to a page that doesn't exist yet.
  
Wikis get their name from the Hawaiian term "wiki wiki," which means "very fast." A wiki is indeed a fast method for creating content as a group. It's a hugely popular format on the Web for creating documents as a group. There is usually no central editor of a wiki, no single person who has final editorial control. Instead, the community edits and develops it's own content. Consensus views emerge from the work of many people on a document.
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{{MediaPlayer | url = https://youtu.be/-bSg8ELA4XE | desc = Overview of the Wiki activity}}
 
 
Moodle's wiki is built on top of an older wiki system called Erfurt wiki http://erfurtwiki.sourceforge.net.
 
  
In Moodle, wikis can be a powerful tool for collaborative work. The entire class can edit a document together, creating a class product, or each student can have their own wiki and work on it with you and their classmates.
 
  
==Tips and tricks==
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* [[Wiki settings]]
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* [[Using Wiki]]
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* [[Wiki_module_FAQ|Wiki FAQ]]
  
*We have course filled with resources and a wiki devoted to equipment located in several remote classrooms, as an aid to instructors. I created my own page that has links to equipment and process pages that I use all the time in giving directions. The front page is organized differently than my page.
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Wikis get their name from the Hawaiian term "wiki wiki," which means "very fast." A wiki is indeed a fast method for creating content as a group. It's a hugely popular format on the Web for creating documents as a group. There is usually no central editor of a wiki, no single person who has final editorial control. Instead, the community edits and develops its own content. Consensus views emerge from the work of many people on a document.
*A useful way of to start a wiki, is to think of the front page as a structured table of contents. Essentially a wiki is organized by its links.
 
  
== See also ==
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In Moodle, wikis can be a powerful tool for collaborative work. The entire class can edit a document together, creating a class product, or each student can have their own wiki, visible only to them and their teacher.
  
*Using Moodle [http://moodle.org/mod/forum/view.php?f=366 Wiki module forum]
 
*[http://download.moodle.org/docs/using_moodle/ch11_wikis.pdf Using Moodle Chapter 11: Wikis]
 
  
[[Category:Teacher]]
 
 
[[Category:Wiki]]
 
[[Category:Wiki]]
[[Category:Modules]]
 
  
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[[ja:Wikiモジュール]]

Latest revision as of 09:15, 8 March 2018

A wiki is a collection of collaboratively authored web documents. Basically, a wiki page is a web page everyone in your class can create together, right in the browser, without needing to know HTML. A wiki starts with one front page. Each author can add other pages to the wiki by simply creating a link to a page that doesn't exist yet.

Overview of the Wiki activity


Wikis get their name from the Hawaiian term "wiki wiki," which means "very fast." A wiki is indeed a fast method for creating content as a group. It's a hugely popular format on the Web for creating documents as a group. There is usually no central editor of a wiki, no single person who has final editorial control. Instead, the community edits and develops its own content. Consensus views emerge from the work of many people on a document.

In Moodle, wikis can be a powerful tool for collaborative work. The entire class can edit a document together, creating a class product, or each student can have their own wiki, visible only to them and their teacher.