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Note: You are currently viewing documentation for Moodle 2.4. Up-to-date documentation for the latest stable version of Moodle may be available here: Text editor.

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<p class="note">'''Note:''' Moodle 2.0 has a new HTML editor. For details of the HTML editor in Moodle prior to 2.0, see [[HTML editor]].</p>
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Multiple Intelligences
  
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The theory of multiple intelligences represents a new framework that considers other gifts that children have. This departs from the traditional, narrow focused notion of intelligence, based on I.Q. testing, is far too limited. The theory encompasses other cultural definitions of intelligence, neurophysiology, anthropological studies and Gardner’s own experimentation and observation of children. The theory devised eight categories of respective intelligence to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults
  
{{Moodle 2.0}}The default HTML editor in Moodle 2.0 onwards is [[TinyMCE]].
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*1. Verbal/Linguistic – refers to linguistic abilities in the complex acquisition, formation and processing of language. The ability to create conceptual verbal patterns as well as thinking symbolically and reasoning abstractly fall under this category. The activities associated with this category is reading, writing, the development of symbolic writing and language skills--anagrams, palindromes, metaphors, similes, puns, and analogies. Traits shared by these children are children who talk early, those who enjoy making sounds and rhyming patterns; children who are prolific readers and have good memories for poetry, lyrics, tongue twisters, and verse may have a propensity in this area. These individuals have infinity for both the written and spoken words, and often think in words. They learn by verbalization and visualization, by seeing and hearing words and usually enjoy word games.
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*2. Logical/mathematical—refers to logical thought abilities- inductively, and to some degree deductively. Within the category children are able to recognize patterns, both geometric and numerical, and include the ability process abstract concepts. Children who possess this form of developed intelligence may be constant questioners; they may easily grasp games that involve sophisticated strategies--like chess; or they may devise experimental formats to test their ideas. Also, they may be fascinated with computers or with puzzles that involving logic and reasoning abilities.  
  
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*3. Spatial Intelligence--deals with the ability to perceive images. Children who fall in this category tend to think in images, they have a strong visual recall ability and are usually the ones able to find missing objects. There is a tendency to be the first to notice things that have been changed or rearranged. Many are earlier drawers--delighted with shapes, lines and colors. The activities that they might enjoy are jigsaw puzzles, mazes, find the hidden picture puzzles and they love to construct things with blocks. They have an early sense of proportion and perspective. They are also good at reading and constructing maps and discerning objects as they might appear in three dimensional spaces. They are often referred to as daydreamers--starring off into space.
  
HTML editor in Moodle 2.0 video:
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*4. Musical – refers to the ability to create or interpret music. Often music plays an important factor when studying, and they are continually humming, singing, tapping out tunes rhythmically, or whistling. Their keen hearing allows them to distinguishing sounds and subtle nuances in music and in the sounds in their environments. These children can also be excellent mimics and can easily discern differences in speech patterns or accents. David Lazear expands this group with the descriptor of rhythmic, and Bob Samples describes this as auditory intelligence.
  
<mediaplayer>http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xJE6UhqnyjU</mediaplayer>
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*5. Bodily/Kinesthetic: the emphasis of gift that these children exhibit deals with the gift of physical movement, both the fine and/or the large muscle systems. Thee find it difficult to sit still over an extended period of time and described as the movers of the universe, and frequently they squirm, rock, even fall off their chairs. They have an adept ability at creating and interpreting gestures and are often attuned at communicating in, or reading others body language. They tend to have the need to enter the personal space of others or to touch them while communicating. This group of students needs to learn by acting and moving, to learn by haptic experiences.
[[Image:HTMLeditor tools M2 1.png|frame|The standard version of the HTML editor tool bar]]
 
  
==List of groups==
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*6. Interpersonal: refers to the ability to understand and communicate with others and to facilitate relationships and group processes. They have the uncanny abilities to read people – the phrase "they can work the room" aptly describes them. They can adjudicate differences between people or groups and often exhibit a high level of empathy. The learning experience that is often enjoyed is cooperative learning experiences and learning is best achieved in cooperative settings.  
For those who are not familiar with the tool bar, here are the functions listed by group using the above example. Remember that the site administrator can edit or provide additonal toolbars.
 
  
Row 1
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*7. Intrapersonal: refers to the ability to be somewhat shielded from their peers; this is motivated by a strong sense of self; to have leadership abilities in reference to making decisions that may not be popular with others. Children in this category tend to show a sense of immunity from peer pressure which is created by this strong sense of self. Often described as "loners" they may have gifts out the ordinary realm of human understanding--strong intuitive feelings, a sense of inner wisdom, or precognition. These children need learning experiences where they can focus on their inner being and activities that allow them to work by themselves on material and projects of their own choosing.
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_font_style.png]] - Font, size and heading group
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_undo_redo.png]] - Undo and Redo group
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_find_replace.png]] - Find and Replace group
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_fullscreen_1.png]]|Full screen toggle
 
Row 2
 
*[[Image:HTML editor group text effects.png]] - Text effect group
 
*[[Image:HTML editor group line format.png]] - Line format group
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_formatting.png]] - Formatting group
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_color.png]] - Color group
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_paragraph.png]] - Paragraph group
 
  
Row 3
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The theory and its categories departs and essentially challenges the dominant focus of most educational institutions, which regards articulate or logical people of our culture as a highly intelligent person. Children, who do not exhibit these traditional traits, are often not positively reinforced with regards to their gifts. Instead they are labeled as children with learning difficulties.  
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_lists.png]] - Number and Bullets and indents
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_link.png]] - Link group
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_insert.png]] - Insert group
 
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_HTML_spell.png]] - HTML source toggle & spellchecker
 
  
==Special features==
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The theory of multiple intelligences challenges and suggests a major transformation within the school system. Within the classroom context, teacher are challenges to present their lessons in a wide variety of ways using music, cooperative learning, art activities, role play, multimedia, field trips, inner reflection, and much more. Within the high school context, when looking at careers, the theory has many strong implications for adult learning and development. As many students at university as well as adults may be in careers that do not make optimal use of their most highly developed intelligences.  
===Color pickers===
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While Gardner contends that all humans have some degree of all seven (now 8)  intelligences, there are those who are more gifted in some areas, or in combinations of areas, than in others.
*[[Image:HTML_editor_group_color.png]]
 
There are 4 levels of selecting a font or background color,  
 
*A quick pick 5x8 matrix of colors
 
*"More colors" that links to Picker, Pallet and Named tabs
 
<gallery>
 
Image:HTML_editor_color_selector_basic_1.png|A quick pick 5x8 matrix of colors
 
Image:HTML_editor_color_selector_more_picker_1.png|A rainbow color picker tab
 
Image:HTML_editor_color_selector_more_pallet_1.png|A Pallet tab with a 18x12 matrix of colors
 
Image:HTML_editor_color_selector_more_named_1.png|A Named tab with custom pallets
 
</gallery>
 
  
===Insert images and media===
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For more information click on: http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/mi/index.html
[[Image:HTML_editor_group_insert_MU_1.png|frame|center|The Insert images and media group]]
 
 
 
* 1 Insert Image - uses [[File picker]]
 
* 2 Insert Emoticon
 
* 3 Insert Media - uses [[File picker]]
 
* 4 Insert Equation - uses java script editor
 
* 5 Insert Non breaking space
 
* 6 Insert Custom character - Special keyboard characters
 
* 7 Insert Table -
 
 
 
 
 
====File picker ====
 
[[Image:Files_File_picker_upload_files_add_1.png|thumb|center|300px|Upload file screen]]
 
 
 
====Equation editor====
 
[[Image:HTML editor equation editor 1.png|thumb|center|300px|]]
 
 
 
====Custom character====
 
[[Image:HTML_editor_custom_character_selector_1.png|thumb|center|300px|]]
 
 
 
====Insert table====
 
<gallery widths="300px">
 
Image:HTMLeditor_Insert_Table_general_1.png|General tab
 
Image:HTMLeditor_Insert_Table_advanced_1.png|Advanced tab
 
</gallery>
 
 
 
==See also==
 
*[[Text editors]] - Moodle 2.0 will handle many kind of text editors
 
*[[HTML editor|Pre Moodle 2.0 HTML editor]] tool bar
 
*Site administration>Appearence>HTML settings - to change emoticon HTML code or images
 
*Site administration>>Plugins>Text editors - change spellchecker and manage text editors
 
[[Category:HTML editor]]
 

Revision as of 04:32, 24 March 2011

Multiple Intelligences

The theory of multiple intelligences represents a new framework that considers other gifts that children have. This departs from the traditional, narrow focused notion of intelligence, based on I.Q. testing, is far too limited. The theory encompasses other cultural definitions of intelligence, neurophysiology, anthropological studies and Gardner’s own experimentation and observation of children. The theory devised eight categories of respective intelligence to account for a broader range of human potential in children and adults

  • 1. Verbal/Linguistic – refers to linguistic abilities in the complex acquisition, formation and processing of language. The ability to create conceptual verbal patterns as well as thinking symbolically and reasoning abstractly fall under this category. The activities associated with this category is reading, writing, the development of symbolic writing and language skills--anagrams, palindromes, metaphors, similes, puns, and analogies. Traits shared by these children are children who talk early, those who enjoy making sounds and rhyming patterns; children who are prolific readers and have good memories for poetry, lyrics, tongue twisters, and verse may have a propensity in this area. These individuals have infinity for both the written and spoken words, and often think in words. They learn by verbalization and visualization, by seeing and hearing words and usually enjoy word games.
  • 2. Logical/mathematical—refers to logical thought abilities- inductively, and to some degree deductively. Within the category children are able to recognize patterns, both geometric and numerical, and include the ability process abstract concepts. Children who possess this form of developed intelligence may be constant questioners; they may easily grasp games that involve sophisticated strategies--like chess; or they may devise experimental formats to test their ideas. Also, they may be fascinated with computers or with puzzles that involving logic and reasoning abilities.
  • 3. Spatial Intelligence--deals with the ability to perceive images. Children who fall in this category tend to think in images, they have a strong visual recall ability and are usually the ones able to find missing objects. There is a tendency to be the first to notice things that have been changed or rearranged. Many are earlier drawers--delighted with shapes, lines and colors. The activities that they might enjoy are jigsaw puzzles, mazes, find the hidden picture puzzles and they love to construct things with blocks. They have an early sense of proportion and perspective. They are also good at reading and constructing maps and discerning objects as they might appear in three dimensional spaces. They are often referred to as daydreamers--starring off into space.
  • 4. Musical – refers to the ability to create or interpret music. Often music plays an important factor when studying, and they are continually humming, singing, tapping out tunes rhythmically, or whistling. Their keen hearing allows them to distinguishing sounds and subtle nuances in music and in the sounds in their environments. These children can also be excellent mimics and can easily discern differences in speech patterns or accents. David Lazear expands this group with the descriptor of rhythmic, and Bob Samples describes this as auditory intelligence.
  • 5. Bodily/Kinesthetic: the emphasis of gift that these children exhibit deals with the gift of physical movement, both the fine and/or the large muscle systems. Thee find it difficult to sit still over an extended period of time and described as the movers of the universe, and frequently they squirm, rock, even fall off their chairs. They have an adept ability at creating and interpreting gestures and are often attuned at communicating in, or reading others body language. They tend to have the need to enter the personal space of others or to touch them while communicating. This group of students needs to learn by acting and moving, to learn by haptic experiences.
  • 6. Interpersonal: refers to the ability to understand and communicate with others and to facilitate relationships and group processes. They have the uncanny abilities to read people – the phrase "they can work the room" aptly describes them. They can adjudicate differences between people or groups and often exhibit a high level of empathy. The learning experience that is often enjoyed is cooperative learning experiences and learning is best achieved in cooperative settings.
  • 7. Intrapersonal: refers to the ability to be somewhat shielded from their peers; this is motivated by a strong sense of self; to have leadership abilities in reference to making decisions that may not be popular with others. Children in this category tend to show a sense of immunity from peer pressure which is created by this strong sense of self. Often described as "loners" they may have gifts out the ordinary realm of human understanding--strong intuitive feelings, a sense of inner wisdom, or precognition. These children need learning experiences where they can focus on their inner being and activities that allow them to work by themselves on material and projects of their own choosing.

The theory and its categories departs and essentially challenges the dominant focus of most educational institutions, which regards articulate or logical people of our culture as a highly intelligent person. Children, who do not exhibit these traditional traits, are often not positively reinforced with regards to their gifts. Instead they are labeled as children with learning difficulties.

The theory of multiple intelligences challenges and suggests a major transformation within the school system. Within the classroom context, teacher are challenges to present their lessons in a wide variety of ways using music, cooperative learning, art activities, role play, multimedia, field trips, inner reflection, and much more. Within the high school context, when looking at careers, the theory has many strong implications for adult learning and development. As many students at university as well as adults may be in careers that do not make optimal use of their most highly developed intelligences. While Gardner contends that all humans have some degree of all seven (now 8) intelligences, there are those who are more gifted in some areas, or in combinations of areas, than in others.

For more information click on: http://www.thirteen.org/edonline/concept2class/mi/index.html